Customs & Quarantine Information

Duty-Free Allowances

Alcoholic Beverages

Limited to 3 bottles per adult (20 years of age). A bottle contains approx. 760 c.c. If the 3-bottle duty-free allowance is surpassed, the following duties will be charged per each additional bottle.

a) Whiskey: 975 yen/bottle (750cc)
b) Brandy: 910yen/bottle (700cc)
c) Gin, Vodka, Rum, & other Spirits: 300 yen/bottle (750 cc)
d) Wine & Others:150 yen/bottle (750 cc)

Tobacco Products

Persons under 20 years of age must pay duties on all tobacco products brought into Japan.

a) For non-residents of Japan, there is a duty-free allowance of 500 grams total of tobacco products consisting of either 400 foreign cigarettes, 100 cigars, or 500 grams of other forms of tobacco, or any combination of the above - provided that the total quantity does not surpass the 500- gram limit. In addition, 200 Japanese cigarettes will be allowed in duty-free.

b) For residents of Japan, there is a duty-free allowance of 250 grams total of tobacco products consisting of either 200 foreign cigarettes, 50 cigars, or 250 grams of other forms of tobacco, or any combination of the above - provided that the total quantity does not surpass the 250 gram limit. In addition, 200 Japanese cigarettes will be allowed in duty-free.

Perfume

Limited to 2oz.

Other Items

The total overseas market value of all the articles other than the above items must be under 200,000 yen to avoid duty. Any item whose total overseas market value does not exceed 10,000 yen is always free of duties and/or taxes and is not counted in the calculation of the total overseas market value of 200,000 yen (e.g. Two ties worth 5,000 yen each).

Clothing, Toiletries, and Other Personal Effects

Such items intended for your own use, as well as portable professional equipment that will be used during your stay in Japan, are free of duties and/or taxes if they are considered appropriate and are not for sale.

Pets

The most reliable information on regulations regarding bringing pets in Japan can be obtained from the Animal Qurantine Service website of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries. Please click the link below.

The Animal Qurantine Service website of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries(http://www.maff.go.jp/aqs/english/index.html)Open in new window

Plants

The most reliable information on regulations regarding bringing plants in Japan can be obtained from the Plants Protection Station website of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries. Please click the link below.

The Plants Protection Station website of the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries(http://www.pps.go.jp/english/index.html)Open in new window

Food

Fresh Products

You should avoid bringing fresh fruit, vegetable, or meat products to Japan. In general, if you do intend to bring these items into Japan, you will need to get the appropriate sanitary documentation from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA).
Please note that the following fresh fruits are prohibited from importation into Japan: Apple, Pear, Quince, Nectarine, Peach, Plum, Apricot, Cherry.

Canned Products

Canned meat, fruit, or vegetable products are allowed.

Dried Produce

Dried fruit or vegetable products are allowed, as long as they are commercially dried (not home dried) and remain in their original, unopened packaging.

Dried Meat

Dried meat may be brought to Japan. It must be commercially prepared, and in its original, unopened packaging. In addition, a special label is required on the packaging of dried meat products to be brought into Japan. The label should read:

"The meat contained herein is for personal use only, and not for sale. It is derived from animals that received ante mortem and postmortem inspection and were found sound and healthy, and has been inspected and passed as provided by law and the regulations of APHIS/USDA."

For more information on the labeling of meat products, please check the US Department of Agriculture web site. Please note that shipping dried meat products (as opposed to carrying them in personal luggage) is strictly prohibited.

Other Processed Foods

Items such as cookies, crackers, candies, cereals, dried noodles, etc., may be brought into Japan. Most types of nuts (with the exception of walnuts, which are prohibited) may be brought into Japan, particularly if they are salted, dried, or roasted.

Medication

You can bring up to one month's supply of prescription drugs into Japan, and up to two month's supply of non-prescription drugs without completing any paperwork. This same rule applies to mailing prescription and/or non-prescription drugs.

It is always a good idea to have a copy of the prescription and/or letter from the prescribing physician explaining the nature of the medication, the purpose of taking it, recommended dosage, and frequency of ingestion.

Please see the following website for those who are bringing medicines for personal use into Japan.
Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare: Information for those who are bringing medicines for personal use into Japan




For information about taking your regular prescription medicine to Japan, as well as other inquiries please check the Japan Customs websiteOpen in new window before departing for Japan.